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New Pool: Duplicate before adding data or after?

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Hi,

I've been doing some shuffling of data to some new drives and installation to a new system. The problem i have is that I've not quite got enough internal disks or system infrastructure in my home environment to simply copy all my data from the old to the new, so I'm having to do it bit by bit (no pun intended). I've come to a minor conundrum; and my question is: is it better to

a. Add 2 empty disks to a pool, turn on duplication and then copy the data to the new pool and let it duplicate as it copies the data to the pool?

or

b. Copy the data to a new single disk, then add another disk to the pool and turn on duplication?

Option b is going to be slightly less risky for me as it means I have less data to shuffle round and am able to another copy of it while I an writing to the new pool. I can then check and make sure there is no issue before wiping the other drive and adding it to the poo, although it might then take a long time to duplicate the data (about 2.5 TB). I suspect option a will be more efficient, as it will simultaneously write to 2 disks, rather than to one then duplicating to another later on, but are there any other issues / pros / cons? Any help greatly appreciated!

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So just to get this straight: WSE 2016 has a 64GB mem limit. I thought about going VirtualBox but that runs under the OS so would be limited to 64GB as well I would think.

With Hyper-V, I can have WSE2016 and a W10 VDI running next to each other under the Hypervisor. WSE2016 would still be limited to 64GB (and I would probaly cap it at 8 or 16GB and the W10 VDI could use a whopping 128GB.

Does that make sense?

Edit: And the HyperVisor console (that is the GUI, right?),  that does not come with W10 Home or WSE 2016, does it?

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So just to get this straight: WSE 2016 has a 64GB mem limit. I thought about going VirtualBox but that runs under the OS so would be limited to 64GB as well I would think.

With Hyper-V, I can have WSE2016 and a W10 VDI running next to each other under the Hypervisor. WSE2016 would still be limited to 64GB (and I would probaly cap it at 8 or 16GB and the W10 VDI could use a whopping 128GB.

Well, RAM and storage space are just like money, they are never too much, but, frankly calling 64GB "a limit" is a bit exagerated..

A 64bit machine tekes on average 1.5/2GB of RAM (which is managed dinamically by HyperV anyway) for personal usage 8GB of ram are more than enough to run the host system and a couple of 64bit guests, unless you need to run SETI@home in one of such machines :D

Quote

Edit: And the HyperVisor console (that is the GUI, right?),  that does not come with W10 Home or WSE 2016, does it?

I never installed W10 home in my life, I didn't see the point of running any windows home when they where paid products, and even less now that PRO and Home are both "free,"... (LTSB2015/LTSB2016 and LTSC are the only worth W10 flavours)

WSE 2016 comes whith the full HyperV role so the consolle is included as well.

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Well, I do do a lot of data analysis for which I use SQL Server and yes, the databases can be quite large :D

I was not aware W10Pro was free. Which is good because I need to get that on my lab-laptop.

I though HyperV role was only available for WS2016 Standard/Enterprise.

Anyway, a lot to take in. Gonna explore some stuff soon. Many thanks!

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I was not aware W10Pro was free. Which is good because I need to get that on my lab-laptop.

I mean not officially.

W10 Pro is "free" in the same meaning as W10 Home. You can buy it, and surely MS is happy if you do that, but you can also upgrade from win 7 and you will get a digital license for that machine. Upgrade from win 7 home and you will get a W10 home license. Upgrade from win 7 Pro and you will get a Win 7 Pro digital license. No matter if Win 7 was bought or not.

MS silently backs this operation because it is desperatley trying to switch from beeing a razor vendor to a blade vendor.

The more W10 are installed the more chances that applications and multimedia stuff will be bought.

Where the OS license still matters for MS are from Servers and LTSB/LTSC which comes free from the metro crap and the store.

Also Pro becomes less Pro on each W10 upgrade, there is "Pro for Workstations" now, which  is the new real Pro.

 

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2 hours ago, t-s said:

MS silently backs this operation because it is desperatley trying to switch from beeing a razor vendor to a blade vendor.
 

MS silently backs this because the license is a one-time, non-transferable license good for use on that hardware build only.  When the CPU/Motherboard/etc (any major component) needs to be replaced, the license becomes invalid and you are forced to purchase a new one at full price, because "the machine changed".

It's a stepping-stone to being locked in to W10, which ultimately doesn't save you anything except a little time.  You're going to have to spend money at some point - only the mobile/tablet sector still gets OSs for free.

If you aren't getting anything with W10 that you seriously need, consider heavily before replacing your W7 OS.

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16 minutes ago, Jaga said:

If you aren't getting anything with W10 that you seriously need, consider heavily before replacing your W7 OS.

As long as your hardware isn't using Skylake or newer CPUs.  
And AMD is doing the same thing (dropping support for Win7). 

So .... yeah....

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54 minutes ago, Jaga said:

MS silently backs this because the license is a one-time, non-transferable license good for use on that hardware build only.  When the CPU/Motherboard/etc (any major component) needs to be replaced, the license becomes invalid and you are forced to purchase a new one at full price, because "the machine changed".

Maybe this is still written somewhere in the eula, but practically isn't true anymore.

Once you get your digital entitlement moving it to a new HW  trough the MS account is possible w/o much hassle

Remember that using W10 is more a favor you're doing to MS than viceversa, so MS agevolates the process in any way.

 

37 minutes ago, Christopher (Drashna) said:

As long as your hardware isn't using Skylake or newer CPUs.  
And AMD is doing the same thing (dropping support for Win7). 

So .... yeah....

LTSB/LTSC are practically the new Win 7 (but given the less spyware and the lack of the store MS wants real money for them just like for older OSes.)

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3 hours ago, Christopher (Drashna) said:

As long as your hardware isn't using Skylake or newer CPUs. 

Yep - ran into the hassle when I first went to do the free upgrade to W10 (~2 years ago?).  Was on a Skylake already and had to do a rebuild.

 

3 hours ago, t-s said:

Maybe this is still written somewhere in the eula, but practically isn't true anymore.

Once you get your digital entitlement moving it to a new HW  trough the MS account is possible w/o much hassle

Remember that using W10 is more a favor you're doing to MS than viceversa, so MS agevolates the process in any way.

I only remember it being a huge hassle and bit of a nightmare when I went to do the upgrade (+rebuild) not long after the free upgrade period ended (W7 to W10).  Perhaps they've loosened it up since then, simply for those reasons.  I just feel obligated to let people know so they can do some reading prior to the upgrade and protect themselves.  MS purposefully obfuscates licensing, so digging is almost mandatory.  If it still works, great.

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On 10/18/2018 at 11:23 AM, t-s said:

LTSB/LTSC are practically the new Win 7 (but given the less spyware and the lack of the store MS wants real money for them just like for older OSes.)

They're both the Enterprise versions, and legally speaking, only available via Volume License means, as far as I'm aware (that and MSDN or whatever they've renamed it to). 

So, Windows 7 Enterprise, or Ultimate, yes. 

 

 

And remember, if you're not the customer, you're the product. 

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