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drmcsmoothie

Bypass Local Cache Drive

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I am using Cloud Drive for "Local Disk"  I understand the design of using a local cache drive for having quick access. This makes sense for accessing data uploaded to the actual cloud. But for "Local Disk" the data is being copied twice, which means it takes twice as long. Plus I will fill the local cache drive before I am done copying.  

 

Anyway to bypass the local cache drive entirely?

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Yes, even with the cache set to "none", it will still specific a drive, and copy to that drive first. This is by design and expected.

 

Unfortunately, it's a part of the provider's architecture adn we don't plan on changing it right now (we may later on). 

There was a technical reason for doing this, but I'll have to ask Alex (the Developer) as I don't specifically remember right now.

 

 

However, there is an upside to this. If you specify a SSD as the cache drive, you should see some pretty fast write speeds for the drive. :)

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As I ponder more about cache drive alternatives. What would be the consensus of using a RAM drive for caching?

It depends on the software you're using to do so, and how much free RAM you have to dedicate for this.

 

Since the cache is used from reboot to reboot.... this may be significantly more dangerous, as you're more likely to lose data due to sudden power loss. 

Specifically, if you have data "to upload" still, it will be in the cache, and if it's lost, you have basically corrupted data. That's why we use a physical disk for this rather than implementing something like a RAM disk. 

 

And StableBit CloudDrive may be significantly heavier on memory than our other products, due to how it works. So you want a decent amount of memory for the system, and then additional for the RAM drive.

 

And because the drive will be throttled as the disk fills up, this could potentially cause issues. Meaning you'd want 60+GBs of RAM to dedicate to this, or more. And that gets expensive FAST. 

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