Jump to content
Covecube Inc.
  • 0

WSUS + DrivePool


JCMarsh
 Share

Question

My WHS2011 box is once again giving me fits. A while back I was running low on space and removed the WSUS role as an interim measure. Since then, I've upgraded the storage in my WHS2011 box to a pair of 3TB WD green's. Now that I've got ample storage space again, I wanted to add the WSUS role. No dice. I went to add the WSUS role, but this time around it wouldn't let me put the WSUS folder on the pool. It said the drive was not formatted as NTFS. 

 

Since first installing DrivePool and enabling the WSUS role this past spring, I've updated DrivePool a couple of times, and it's currently at version 1.3.5.7572. I'm not sure why I can't put the folder on the pool. I assumed that the OS saw the pool as NTFS, but apparently I was wrong. I put the WSUS folder on the OS drive to get it going, but I'd rather not keep it there. Can this be fixed, or should I just give up on WSUS?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Odd thing is, that even though I didn't put the WSUS folder in /ServerFolders, after adding WSUS I have a trio of WSUS folders that show up as network shares. Looking into the /ServerFolders directory on C: (OS) and D: (pool), there are no such folders. My pool disks contain only the poolpart folders.

 

Having issues with my Win7 desktop right now, I may just have to shift focus to that and abandon WSUS altogether. I've already put Lubuntu on four of my BOINC boxes, and will do the same with the remaining XP machine soon, which leaves 1 Vista and 1 Win7 machine, so updates for those shouldn't really be putting much of a hurt on my bandwidth. Yup, I think I will. Time to blow out WSUS again, and then wipe+reload my Win7 box. I better get to work, then...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

JMarsh,

 

You can run "fsmgmt.msc" to see where the shared folders are actually located.

 

Worst case, I believe you can use the dashboard to move the folder, if you want.

 

 

But if you're minimizing the number of Windows machines, then the usefulness of WSUS drops significantly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Drashna,

Thanks for the info. That looks like a rather minimal little utility, but that makes sense. It just does what you want; manage shares. Will keep that in mind next time I need to do so.

 

As for WSUS, I blew it out already, and I'm not looking back this time. Part of me wants to run a transparent, caching proxy between my network and the outside world, and that would effectively become a replacement for WSUS, but I already have too many machines on 24/7.

 

I'm starting to think there should be a 12-step program for geeks/nerds. Is 17 "screens" too many for two people?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Well, it's also in "Computer Management", but yeah, that one is meant specifically for managing shared folders (SMB and NFS, actually.... though I'm not sure how well it manages NFS).

 

 

As for WSUS... yeah. I totally understand that.

But as for too many computers... there is a solution for that: virtualization.  Personally, I like HyperV. :)
But 17 screens isn't enough. Not by a long shot. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...