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QoS: used ports / protocol


joss
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Hi there,

 

we have a router that's pre-configured by our ISP and it comes with invisible QoS-settings we can't see or change (i.e. for streaming or IP-telephone).

 

CloudDrive uses a port or protocol that's prioritised - we can see it on the traffic-monitor. Not every uploading activity from CloudDrive is prioritised traffic, it's a mix so I suspect CloudDrive to use multiple ports.

 

In fact our internet collapses when CloudDrive is uploading.  :(

 

Would you mind to tell which ports/protocols CloudDrive uses?

So we could try to talk with our ISP.

 

Thanks

:)

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This varies depending on the service. 

 

However, most use a REST API over HTTP(S). That means that it appears as normal web traffic. 

 

Amazon S3, Zure Storage, Google Cloud Storage, Google Drive, Box, and DropBox all use REST API, I believe. 

 

OneDrive and OneDrive for Business do not, I believe. 

 

 

Unfortunately, this means that throttling the connection isn't feasible with most consumer grade routers.  It is possible, but it depends more on the device or sites in question, and less on the type of traffic. 

 

 

 

However, decreasing the number of IO threads may help with this, as it will reduce the number of concurrent requests used. 

To change this, open the UI, click on "Drive Options" -> Performance -> "I/O Performance" and decrease the number of upload and download threads. 

 

 

 

Additionally, we do plan on adding throttling options to StableBit CloudDrive in the future, to facilitate this on the client itself, rather than having to rely on the router. 

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Thank you, Christopher,

 

we are using Google Drive.

 

Unfortunately, I have no idea about REST API - again a thing beyond my grasp  :unsure: 

 

Normal web traffic isn't prioritised by our router/QoS. Traffic from the Google Drive Desktop App likewise. In fact I never have seen priority upload traffic before but for voice over IP in the router GUI.
I don't want to throttle in this case - CloudDrive should be allowed to use free bandwidth but not to use it exclusively because the router thinks it's VIP-trafiic. .

 

 

Is there no chance to get a port or port range and the protocol (TCP/UDP)?
Then I could try if I can override the ISP's settings with a custom QoS rule and set the priority down.

 

I'm aware that this is a very special problem. Sorry for any inconvenience  :( 
 

 

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REST API is an API that works over HTTP/HTTPS.  So there really isn't a good way to distinguish the traffic type without reading it. That's a sophisticated feature, and not usually available in consumer grade routers. 

 

 

 

There is no way to change the protocol, as it's done over HTTP, period. And as for changing the port? Not really. Again, HTTP traffic, and it depends EXCLUSIVELY on the provider in question (and I don't believe that Google offers a non-HTTP port to use for this. 

 

If your router has the option (some do), throttling each connection, rather than all traffic is the best option here. That way, it will throttle a client that is saturating the connection, so that others can connect. 

Though this depends heavily on the router, itself. 

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It'd be nice if an option was added that let us specify a DSCP value. When employing QoS at the router, this makes it much easier to differentiate between traffic that makes use of the same ports.

 

Edit:

AF11 (DSCP 10) would be a good default value.

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Request added. 

https://stablebit.com/Admin/IssueAnalysis/25932

 

But just keep in mind, that this may not make it in for a while, if it does.  

THe issue with doing this is that access to the service provider is basically like access to the platters of a disk or nand cells on a SSD.  Dropped packets are bad, and lower priority means increased latency. So, it may be problematic to do so, but it may not...

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